New Evidence Indicates Enough Illegal Ballots in Georgia to Tip 2020 Results

Political

New evidence indicates that more than 10,300 illegal ballots were cast in Georgia during the November 2020 election, a number that is likely to rise over the coming months

In Georgia, there was both an “audit” and a statewide recount confirming Biden’s victory, but ignored was evidence that tens of thousands of Georgians potentially voted illegally.

Under Georgia law, residents must vote in the county in which they reside, unless they changed their residence within 30 days of the election. As Jake Evans, a well-known Atlanta election lawyer, said, outside of the 30-day grace period, if people vote in a county in which they no longer reside, “Their vote in that county would be illegal.”

Soon after the November election, Mark Davis, the president of Data Productions Inc. and an expert in voter data analytics and residency issues, obtained data from the National Change of Address (NCOA) database that identified Georgia residents who had confirmed moves with the U.S. Postal Service.

After excluding moves with effective dates within 30 days of the general election, and by using data available from the Georgia Secretary of State’s Office, Davis identified nearly 35,000 Georgia voters who indicated they had moved from one Georgia county to another, but then voted in the 2020 general election in the county from which they had moved.

“It was disconcerting to see the media and the courts largely ignore serious issues like these, especially since the data I was seeing showed very legitimate issues,” Davis said. But he continued quietly working on the issue, working to identify illegal votes.

In May of 2021, Davis says he received an updated voter database from the Gregoria Secretary of State’s office. “I imported the data and compared voter’s addresses to the NCOA information I processed in November,” Davis said.

When Davis ran the data, he found that, of the approximately 35,000 Georgians who indicated they had moved from one county to another county more than 30 days before the November general election, as of May, more than 10,300 had updated their voter registration information, providing the secretary of state the exact address they had previously provided to the USPS, the Federalist reported. Those same 10,000-plus individuals all also cast ballots in the county in which they had previously lived.

“That number continues to increase every day as more and more people update their registrations,” Davis said. “I have little doubt that the total number will eventually meet and then exceed President Biden’s margin of victory in Georgia.”

Davis’s work is consistent with an earlier analysis conducted by the Voter Integrity Project (VIP) which showed more than 20,000 people who voted in Georgia did not meet the state’s residency requirements.

“These issues were absolutely systemic,” Davis stressed, noting “they occurred in every county in the state, in every state house, state senate, and in every congressional district in the state.”

Jake Evans, who holds the distinction of being the only lawyer in Georgia history to successfully overturn two elections in the same race, concurred with Davis.

Under Georgia law, Evans explained, “an election should be overturned either if (1) more votes than decided the election were illegal, wrongfully rejected or irregular, or (2) when there were systemic irregularities that cast in doubt the results of the election.”

Davis’s data proves significant because critics of Trump’s challenge to the certification of Georgia’s election results framed the NCOA information as either unreliable or of an insufficient magnitude to cast the outcome of the election in doubt. But by updating their voter registration information with the same address as contained in the NCOA database, the voters themselves have established the reliability of that information, Margot Cleveland writes.

Source: New Evidence Indicates Enough Illegal Ballots in Georgia to Tip 2020 Results

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